Articles | Volume 15, issue 15
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 8795–8808, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-8795-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 8795–8808, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-8795-2015

Research article 10 Aug 2015

Research article | 10 Aug 2015

A comparison of chemical mechanisms using tagged ozone production potential (TOPP) analysis

J. Coates and T. M. Butler

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Cited articles

Atkinson, R.: Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx, Atmos. Environ., 34, 2063–2101, 2000.
Baker, A. K., Beyersdorf, A. J., Doezema, L. A., Katzenstein, A., Meinardi, S., Simpson, I. J., Blake, D. R., and Rowland, F. S.: Measurements of nonmethane hydrocarbons in 28 United States cities, Atmos. Environ., 42, 170–182, 2008.
Bloss, C., Wagner, V., Jenkin, M. E., Volkamer, R., Bloss, W. J., Lee, J. D., Heard, D. E., Wirtz, K., Martin-Reviejo, M., Rea, G., Wenger, J. C., and Pilling, M. J.: Development of a detailed chemical mechanism (MCMv3.1) for the atmospheric oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 641–664, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-5-641-2005, 2005.
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We show that simplified chemical mechanisms break down VOC into smaller sized degradation products on the first day faster than the near-explicit MCM chemical mechanism which would lead to an underprediction of ozone levels downwind of VOC emissions, and an underestimation of the VOC contribution to tropospheric background ozone when using simplified chemical mechanisms in regional or global modelling studies.
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