Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-691
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-691
18 Aug 2020
 | 18 Aug 2020
Status: this preprint was under review for the journal ACP but the revision was not accepted.

Observed changes in the temperature dependence response of surface ozone under NOx reductions

Noelia Otero, Henning W. Rust, and Tim Butler

Abstract. Due to the strong temperature dependence of surface ozone concentrations (O3), future warmer conditions may worsen ozone pollution levels despite continued efforts on emission controls of ozone precursors. Using long-term measurements of hourly O3 concentrations co-located with NOx concentrations in stations distributed throughout Germany, we assess changes in the climate penalty, defined as the slope of ozone-temperature relationship during the period 1999–2018. We find a stronger temperature sensitivity in the urban stations over the southwestern regions, especially in the first period of the study (1999–2008).We show a decrease in the climate penalty in most of stations during the second period of the study (2009–2018), with some exceptions (e.g. Berlin) where the climate penalty did not show significant changes. To examine the impacts of NOx reductions on the O3 sensitivity to temperature, we propose a statistical approach based on generalized additive models (GAMs) to describe ozone production rates, inferred from hourly observations, as a function of NOx and temperature, among other variables relevant during the O3 production. We find lower O3 production rates during the second period (2009–2018) at most stations and a decreasing sensitivity to temperature, pointing out that lowering NOx concentrations resulted in decreasing O3 production rates. However, we also observe changes in the shape of the function representing the O3-temperature relationship, which indicate that NOx reductions alone can not explain the changes in the temperature dependence of O3. Our analysis would suggest that decreasing NOx concentrations are not the only factor causing the observed changes in the climate penalty factor.

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Noelia Otero, Henning W. Rust, and Tim Butler
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Noelia Otero, Henning W. Rust, and Tim Butler
Noelia Otero, Henning W. Rust, and Tim Butler

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Short summary
Surface ozone concentrations are strongly correlated with temperature in summertime. Using long-term measurements, we investigate changes in the observed relationship between ozone and temperature over Germany. We propose a new statistical approach based on Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) to describe ozone production rates as a function of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and temperature. Our results suggest that NOx reductions alone can not explain the changes in the temperature dependence of ozone.
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