Articles | Volume 14, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 12455–12464, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-12455-2014
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 12455–12464, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-12455-2014
Research article
27 Nov 2014
Research article | 27 Nov 2014

Modeling of gaseous methylamines in the global atmosphere: impacts of oxidation and aerosol uptake

F. Yu and G. Luo

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Short summary
Global lifetimes and concentrations of gaseous methylamines (MMA, DMA, and TMA) have been simulated. Oxidation and aerosol uptakes are dominant sinks for these methylamines. The oxidation alone leads to their lifetimes of 5-10h in most parts of low and middle latitude regions. The uptake by secondary species can shorten their lifetime to as low as 1-2h over central Europe, eastern Asia, and the eastern US. The modeled concentrations are substantially lower than observed values available.
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