Articles | Volume 20, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11593–11606, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11593-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11593–11606, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11593-2020
Research article
12 Oct 2020
Research article | 12 Oct 2020

Optical properties and composition of viscous organic particles found in the Southern Great Plains

Matthew Fraund et al.

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Cited articles

Adachi, K. and Buseck, P. R.: Atmospheric tar balls from biomass burning in Mexico, J. Geophys. Res., 116, D05204, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010JD015102, 2011. 
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ARM: Data Discovery, available at: https://adc.arm.gov/discovery/, last access: 10 May 2019. 
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Short summary
High viscosity organic particles (HVOPs) in the Southern Great Plains have been analyzed, and two particle types were found. Previously studied tar balls and the recently discovered airborne soil organic particles (ASOPs) are both shown to be brown carbon (BrC). These particle types can be identified in bulk by an absorption Ångström exponent approaching 2.6. HVOP types can be differentiated by comparing carbon absorption spectrum peak ratios between the carboxylic acid, alcohol, and sp2 peaks.
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