Articles | Volume 18, issue 6
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 3937–3949, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-3937-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 3937–3949, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-3937-2018

Research article 20 Mar 2018

Research article | 20 Mar 2018

Secondary sulfate is internally mixed with sea spray aerosol and organic aerosol in the winter Arctic

Rachel M. Kirpes et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kerri Pratt on behalf of the Authors (17 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (11 Feb 2018) by Annmarie Carlton

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Kerri Pratt on behalf of the Authors (13 Mar 2018)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (16 Mar 2018) by Annmarie Carlton
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Short summary
Arctic atmospheric particles have important climate impacts via cloud formation and precipitation, particularly in the wintertime. We show that sulfate, formed during atmospheric transport, is within individual sea spray particles and organic particles measured in the Alaskan Arctic. Greater contributions of combustion emissions were observed when the wind direction came from the Prudhoe Bay oil fields, showing its regional influence.
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