Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2585–2600, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2585-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2585–2600, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2585-2018

Research article 21 Feb 2018

Research article | 21 Feb 2018

Chemical characterization of fine particulate matter emitted by peat fires in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, during the 2015 El Niño

Thilina Jayarathne et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions from Indonesian peat burning were measured in situ. Fuel-based emission factors from 6.0–29.6 gPM kg-1. Detailed chemical analysis revealed high levels of organic carbon that was primarily water insoluble, little to no detectable elemental carbon, and alkane contributions to organic carbon in the range of 6 %. These data were used to estimate that 3.2–11 Tg of PM2.5 were emitted by the 2015 peat burning episodes in Indonesia.
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