Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2585–2600, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2585-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2585–2600, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2585-2018
Research article
21 Feb 2018
Research article | 21 Feb 2018

Chemical characterization of fine particulate matter emitted by peat fires in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, during the 2015 El Niño

Thilina Jayarathne et al.

Related authors

Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of particulate matter from wood- and dung-fueled cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources
Thilina Jayarathne, Chelsea E. Stockwell, Prakash V. Bhave, Puppala S. Praveen, Chathurika M. Rathnayake, Md. Robiul Islam, Arnico K. Panday, Sagar Adhikari, Rashmi Maharjan, J. Douglas Goetz, Peter F. DeCarlo, Eri Saikawa, Robert J. Yokelson, and Elizabeth A. Stone
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2259–2286, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2259-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2259-2018, 2018
Short summary
Relative importance of black carbon, brown carbon, and absorption enhancement from clear coatings in biomass burning emissions
Rudra P. Pokhrel, Eric R. Beamesderfer, Nick L. Wagner, Justin M. Langridge, Daniel A. Lack, Thilina Jayarathne, Elizabeth A. Stone, Chelsea E. Stockwell, Robert J. Yokelson, and Shane M. Murphy
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 5063–5078, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-5063-2017,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-5063-2017, 2017
Short summary
Influence of rain on the abundance of bioaerosols in fine and coarse particles
Chathurika M. Rathnayake, Nervana Metwali, Thilina Jayarathne, Josh Kettler, Yuefan Huang, Peter S. Thorne, Patrick T. O'Shaughnessy, and Elizabeth A. Stone
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2459–2475, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2459-2017,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2459-2017, 2017
Short summary
Qualitative and quantitative analysis of atmospheric organosulfates in Centreville, Alabama
Anusha P. S. Hettiyadura, Thilina Jayarathne, Karsten Baumann, Allen H. Goldstein, Joost A. de Gouw, Abigail Koss, Frank N. Keutsch, Kate Skog, and Elizabeth A. Stone
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1343–1359, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1343-2017,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1343-2017, 2017
Short summary
Field measurements of trace gases and aerosols emitted by peat fires in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, during the 2015 El Niño
Chelsea E. Stockwell, Thilina Jayarathne, Mark A. Cochrane, Kevin C. Ryan, Erianto I. Putra, Bambang H. Saharjo, Ati D. Nurhayati, Israr Albar, Donald R. Blake, Isobel J. Simpson, Elizabeth A. Stone, and Robert J. Yokelson
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 11711–11732, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11711-2016,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11711-2016, 2016
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Aerosols | Research Activity: Field Measurements | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Chemistry (chemical composition and reactions)
Oxidation pathways and emission sources of atmospheric particulate nitrate in Seoul: based on δ15N and Δ17O measurements
Saehee Lim, Meehye Lee, Joel Savarino, and Paolo Laj
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 5099–5115, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5099-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5099-2022, 2022
Short summary
Measurement report: Characterization and source apportionment of coarse particulate matter in Hong Kong: insights into the constituents of unidentified mass and source origins in a coastal city in southern China
Yee Ka Wong, Kin Man Liu, Claisen Yeung, Kenneth K. M. Leung, and Jian Zhen Yu
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 5017–5031, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5017-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5017-2022, 2022
Short summary
The optical properties and in-situ observational evidence for the formation of brown carbon in clouds
Ziyong Guo, Yuxiang Yang, Xiaodong Hu, Xiaocong Peng, Yuzhen Fu, Wei Sun, Guohua Zhang, Duohong Chen, Xinhui Bi, Xinming Wang, and Ping'an Peng
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4827–4839, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4827-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4827-2022, 2022
Short summary
High atmospheric oxidation capacity drives wintertime nitrate pollution in the eastern Yangtze River Delta of China
Han Zang, Yue Zhao, Juntao Huo, Qianbiao Zhao, Qingyan Fu, Yusen Duan, Jingyuan Shao, Cheng Huang, Jingyu An, Likun Xue, Ziyue Li, Chenxi Li, and Huayun Xiao
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4355–4374, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4355-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4355-2022, 2022
Short summary
Development and evolution of an anomalous Asian dust event across Europe in March 2020
Laura Tositti, Erika Brattich, Claudio Cassardo, Pietro Morozzi, Alessandro Bracci, Angela Marinoni, Silvana Di Sabatino, Federico Porcù, and Alessandro Zappi
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4047–4073, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4047-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4047-2022, 2022
Short summary

Cited articles

Akagi, S. K., Yokelson, R. J., Wiedinmyer, C., Alvarado, M. J., Reid, J. S., Karl, T., Crounse, J. D., and Wennberg, P. O.: Emission factors for open and domestic biomass burning for use in atmospheric models, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 4039–4072, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-4039-2011, 2011.
Al-Naiema, I., Estillore, A. D., Mudunkotuwa, I. A., Grassian, V. H., and Stone, E. A.: Impacts of Co-firing Biomass on Emissions of Particulate Matter to the Atmosphere, Fuel, 162, 111–120, 2015.
Andreae, M. O. and Merlet, P.: Emission of Trace Gases and Aerosols from Biomass Burning, Global Biogeochem. Cy., 15, 955–966, 2001.
Armstrong, B., Hutchinson, E., Unwin, J., and Fletcher, T.: Lung Cancer Risk after Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Review and Meta-analysis, Environ. Health Perspect., 112, 970–978, 2004.
Baker, E.: Chemistry and Morphology of Plant Epicuticular Waxes, in: The Plant Cuticle, edited by: Cutler, D. F., Alvin, K. L., Price, C. E., London: Academic Press, 139–166,, 1982,
Short summary
Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions from Indonesian peat burning were measured in situ. Fuel-based emission factors from 6.0–29.6 gPM kg-1. Detailed chemical analysis revealed high levels of organic carbon that was primarily water insoluble, little to no detectable elemental carbon, and alkane contributions to organic carbon in the range of 6 %. These data were used to estimate that 3.2–11 Tg of PM2.5 were emitted by the 2015 peat burning episodes in Indonesia.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint