Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2011–2034, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2011-2018

Special issue: Atmospheric emissions from oil sands development and their...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2011–2034, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2011-2018

Research article 13 Feb 2018

Research article | 13 Feb 2018

Contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to ambient ammonia in the Athabasca Oil Sands and north-western Canada

Cynthia H. Whaley et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Cynthia Whaley on behalf of the Authors (20 Dec 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Jan 2018) by Jan W. Bottenheim
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (04 Jan 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Jan 2018) by Jan W. Bottenheim
AR by Cynthia Whaley on behalf of the Authors (25 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (26 Jan 2018) by Jan W. Bottenheim
AR by Cynthia Whaley on behalf of the Authors (26 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Using a modified air quality forecasting model, we have found that a significant fraction (> 50 %) of ambient ammonia comes from re-emission from plants and soils in the broader Athabasca Oil Sands region and much of Alberta and Saskatchewan. We also found that about 20 % of ambient ammonia in Alberta and Saskatchewan came from forest fires in the summer of 2013. The addition of these two processes improved modelled ammonia, which was a motivating factor in undertaking this research.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint