Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2011–2034, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2011-2018

Special issue: Atmospheric emissions from oil sands development and their...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2011–2034, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2011-2018

Research article 13 Feb 2018

Research article | 13 Feb 2018

Contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to ambient ammonia in the Athabasca Oil Sands and north-western Canada

Cynthia H. Whaley et al.

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Short summary
Using a modified air quality forecasting model, we have found that a significant fraction (> 50 %) of ambient ammonia comes from re-emission from plants and soils in the broader Athabasca Oil Sands region and much of Alberta and Saskatchewan. We also found that about 20 % of ambient ammonia in Alberta and Saskatchewan came from forest fires in the summer of 2013. The addition of these two processes improved modelled ammonia, which was a motivating factor in undertaking this research.
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