Articles | Volume 18, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12859–12875, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12859-2018

Special issue: Study of ozone, aerosols and radiation over the Tibetan Plateau...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12859–12875, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12859-2018

Research article 06 Sep 2018

Research article | 06 Sep 2018

Concentration, temporal variation, and sources of black carbon in the Mt. Everest region retrieved by real-time observation and simulation

Xintong Chen et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Shichang Kang on behalf of the Authors (14 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Jun 2018) by Wenshou Tian
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Jun 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (06 Aug 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (19 Aug 2018) by Wenshou Tian
AR by Shichang Kang on behalf of the Authors (21 Aug 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (27 Aug 2018) by Wenshou Tian
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Short summary
To understand the impact of transboundary atmospheric black carbon on the Mt. Everest region and depict the transport pathways in different spatiotemporal scales, we first investigated the concentration level, temporal variation, and sources of black carbon based on high-resolution (2-year) measurements at Qomolangma (Mt. Everest) Station (4276 m a.s.l.). Next, the WRF-Chem simulations were used to reveal the transport mechanisms of black carbon from southern Asia to the Mt. Everest region.
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