Articles | Volume 16, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13561–13577, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13561-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13561–13577, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13561-2016

Research article 01 Nov 2016

Research article | 01 Nov 2016

Why do models overestimate surface ozone in the Southeast United States?

Katherine R. Travis et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Katherine Travis on behalf of the Authors (23 Jun 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (01 Jul 2016) by Laurens Ganzeveld
AR by Katherine Travis on behalf of the Authors (05 Jul 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (23 Aug 2016) by Laurens Ganzeveld
AR by Katherine Travis on behalf of the Authors (20 Sep 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (05 Oct 2016) by Laurens Ganzeveld
AR by Katherine Travis on behalf of the Authors (05 Oct 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Oct 2016) by Laurens Ganzeveld
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Short summary
Ground-level ozone pollution in the Southeast US involves complex chemistry driven by anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and biogenic emissions of isoprene. We find that US NOx emissions are overestimated nationally by as much as 50 % and that reducing model emissions by this amount results in good agreement with SEAC4RS aircraft measurements in August and September 2013. Observations of nitrate wet deposition fluxes and satellite NO2 columns further support this result.
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