Articles | Volume 16, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13561–13577, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13561-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13561–13577, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13561-2016

Research article 01 Nov 2016

Research article | 01 Nov 2016

Why do models overestimate surface ozone in the Southeast United States?

Katherine R. Travis et al.

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Short summary
Ground-level ozone pollution in the Southeast US involves complex chemistry driven by anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and biogenic emissions of isoprene. We find that US NOx emissions are overestimated nationally by as much as 50 % and that reducing model emissions by this amount results in good agreement with SEAC4RS aircraft measurements in August and September 2013. Observations of nitrate wet deposition fluxes and satellite NO2 columns further support this result.
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