Articles | Volume 21, issue 8
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6093-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6093-2021
Research article
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26 Apr 2021
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 26 Apr 2021

Observing the timescales of aerosol–cloud interactions in snapshot satellite images

Edward Gryspeerdt, Tom Goren, and Tristan W. P. Smith

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Cited articles

Ackerman, A. S., Toon, O. B., and Hobbs, P. V.: Dissipation of Marine Stratiform Clouds and Collapse of the Marine Boundary Layer Due to the Depletion of Cloud Condensation Nuclei by Clouds, Science, 262, 226–229, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.262.5131.226, 1993. a
Ackerman, A. S., Kirkpatrick, M. P., Stevens, D. E., and Toon, O. B.: The impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432, 1014, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature03174, 2004. a, b, c
Albrecht, B. A.: Aerosols, Cloud Microphysics, and Fractional Cloudiness, Science, 245, 1227–1230, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.245.4923.1227, 1989. a
Bennartz, R. and Rausch, J.: Global and regional estimates of warm cloud droplet number concentration based on 13 years of AQUA-MODIS observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9815–9836, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9815-2017, 2017. a
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Short summary
Cloud responses to aerosol are time-sensitive, but this development is rarely observed. This study uses isolated aerosol perturbations from ships to measure this development and shows that macrophysical (width, cloud fraction, detectability) and microphysical (droplet number) properties of ship tracks vary strongly with time since emission, background cloud and meteorological state. This temporal development should be considered when constraining aerosol–cloud interactions with observations.
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