Articles | Volume 19, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1147–1172, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1147-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1147–1172, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1147-2019

Research article 30 Jan 2019

Research article | 30 Jan 2019

Cloud feedbacks in extratropical cyclones: insight from long-term satellite data and high-resolution global simulations

Daniel T. McCoy et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Daniel McCoy on behalf of the Authors (23 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Nov 2018) by Johannes Quaas
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (14 Dec 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Jan 2019)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (17 Jan 2019) by Johannes Quaas
AR by Daniel McCoy on behalf of the Authors (21 Jan 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The largest single source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity predicted by global climate models is how much low-altitude clouds change as the climate warms. Models predict that the amount of liquid within and the brightness of low-altitude clouds increase in the extratropics with warming. We show that increased fluxes of moisture into extratropical storms in the midlatitudes explain the majority of the observed trend and the modeled increase in liquid water within these storms.
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