Articles | Volume 18, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5253–5264, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5253-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5253–5264, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5253-2018

Research article 18 Apr 2018

Research article | 18 Apr 2018

The sensitivity of Alpine summer convection to surrogate climate change: an intercomparison between convection-parameterizing and convection-resolving models

Michael Keller et al.

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Cited articles

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Deep convection is often associated with thunderstorms and heavy rain events. In this study, the sensitivity of Alpine deep convective events to environmental parameters and climate warming is investigated. To this end, simulations are conducted at resolutions of 12 and 2 km. The results show that the climate change signal strongly depends upon the horizontal resolution. In particular, significant differences are found in terms of the radiative feedbacks.
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