Articles | Volume 17, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 14661–14674, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-14661-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 14661–14674, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-14661-2017
Research article
08 Dec 2017
Research article | 08 Dec 2017

Surface ozone and its precursors at Summit, Greenland: comparison between observations and model simulations

Yaoxian Huang et al.

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Short summary
A global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) was employed to simulate surface ozone and its precursors at Summit, Greenland in the Arctic and compare them with 2-year in situ surface observations. The model performed well in simulating certain species (such as carbon monoxide and propane), but some significant discrepancies were identified for other species (e.g., nitrogen oxides, ethane, PAN, and ozone). We further investigated the exact causes for model–data biases.
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