Articles | Volume 16, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 777–797, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-777-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 777–797, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-777-2016

Research article 25 Jan 2016

Research article | 25 Jan 2016

Impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: a numerical study with the WRF-Chem model

A Vara-Vela et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
This study provides a first step to understand the impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of secondary particles as well as the feedback between these particles and meteorology in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA). Among the main research findings are: - The emissions of primary gases from vehicles led to a production between 20 and 30 % due to new particles formation in relation to the total mass concentration PM2.5 in the downtown SPMA.
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