Articles | Volume 22, issue 14
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9299-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9299-2022
Research article
 | 
20 Jul 2022
Research article |  | 20 Jul 2022

Radiative impacts of the Australian bushfires 2019–2020 – Part 1: Large-scale radiative forcing

Pasquale Sellitto, Redha Belhadji, Corinna Kloss, and Bernard Legras

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Cited articles

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Short summary
As a consequence of extreme heat and drought, record-breaking wildfires ravaged south-eastern Australia during the fire season in 2019–2020. Fires injected a smoke plume very high up to the stratosphere, which dispersed quite quickly to the whole Southern Hemisphere and interacted with solar radiation, reflecting and absorbing part of it – thus producing impacts on the climate system. Here we estimate this impact on radiation and we study how it depends on the properties and ageing of the plume.
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