Articles | Volume 22, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4853–4866, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4853-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4853–4866, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4853-2022
Research article
12 Apr 2022
Research article | 12 Apr 2022

Insights into the significant increase in ozone during COVID-19 in a typical urban city of China

Kun Zhang et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-834', Anonymous Referee #1, 31 Oct 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', kun zhang, 15 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-834', Anonymous Referee #2, 05 Dec 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', kun zhang, 15 Feb 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-834', Anonymous Referee #3, 29 Dec 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC3', kun zhang, 15 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by kun zhang on behalf of the Authors (15 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (02 Mar 2022) by Andrea Pozzer
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 Mar 2022)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (22 Mar 2022) by Andrea Pozzer
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Short summary
A significant increase in O3 concentrations was found during the lockdown period of COVID-19 in most areas of China. By field measurements coupled with machine learning, an observation-based model (OBM) and sensitivity analysis, we found the changes in the NOx / VOC ratio were a key reason for the significant rise in O3. To restrain O3 pollution, more efforts should be devoted to the control of anthropogenic OVOCs, alkenes and aromatics.
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