Articles | Volume 22, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 2419–2445, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-2419-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 2419–2445, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-2419-2022

Research article 22 Feb 2022

Research article | 22 Feb 2022

The contribution of coral-reef-derived dimethyl sulfide to aerosol burden over the Great Barrier Reef: a modelling study

Sonya L. Fiddes et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-507', Anonymous Referee #1, 25 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-507', Anonymous Referee #2, 15 Sep 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-507', Sonya Fiddes, 30 Nov 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Sonya Fiddes on behalf of the Authors (30 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (30 Dec 2021) by Susannah Burrows
Short summary
Coral reefs have been found to produce the climatically relevant chemical compound dimethyl sulfide (DMS). It has been suggested that corals can modify their environment via the production of DMS. We use an atmospheric chemistry model to test this theory at a regional scale for the first time. We find that it is unlikely that coral-reef-derived DMS has an influence over local climate, in part due to the proximity to terrestrial and anthropogenic aerosol sources.
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