Articles | Volume 22, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 1739–1756, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1739-2022

Special issue: Resolving uncertainties in solar geoengineering through multi-model...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 1739–1756, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1739-2022

Research article 04 Feb 2022

Research article | 04 Feb 2022

Limitations of assuming internal mixing between different aerosol species: a case study with sulfate geoengineering simulations

Daniele Visioni et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-678', Olivier Boucher, 18 Aug 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on CC1', Daniele Visioni, 18 Nov 2021
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-678', Anonymous Referee #1, 23 Oct 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC1', Daniele Visioni, 18 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-678', Anonymous Referee #2, 04 Nov 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Daniele Visioni, 18 Nov 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Daniele Visioni on behalf of the Authors (18 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Nov 2021) by Fangqun Yu
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Nov 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (16 Dec 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Dec 2021) by Fangqun Yu
AR by Daniele Visioni on behalf of the Authors (05 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Jan 2022) by Fangqun Yu
Download
Short summary
Aerosols are simulated in a simplified way in climate models: in the model analyzed here, they are represented in every grid as described by three simple logarithmic distributions, mixing all different species together. The size can evolve when new particles are formed, particles merge together to create a larger one or particles are deposited to the surface. This approximation normally works fairly well. Here we show however that when large amounts of sulfate are simulated, there are problems.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint