Articles | Volume 21, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4103–4121, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4103-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4103–4121, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4103-2021

Research article 18 Mar 2021

Research article | 18 Mar 2021

Simulations of anthropogenic bromoform indicate high emissions at the coast of East Asia

Josefine Maas et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Josefine Maas on behalf of the Authors (07 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Dec 2020) by Neil Harris
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (06 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Jan 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Jan 2021) by Neil Harris
AR by Josefine Maas on behalf of the Authors (23 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (25 Jan 2021) by Neil Harris
Download
Short summary
Cooling-water disinfection at coastal power plants is a known source of atmospheric bromoform. A large source of anthropogenic bromoform is the industrial regions in East Asia. In current bottom-up flux estimates, these anthropogenic emissions are missing, underestimating the global air–sea flux of bromoform. With transport simulations, we show that by including anthropogenic bromoform from cooling-water treatment, the bottom-up flux estimates significantly improve in East and Southeast Asia.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint