Articles | Volume 21, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4103–4121, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4103-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4103–4121, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4103-2021

Research article 18 Mar 2021

Research article | 18 Mar 2021

Simulations of anthropogenic bromoform indicate high emissions at the coast of East Asia

Josefine Maas et al.

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Latest update: 23 Jan 2022
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Short summary
Cooling-water disinfection at coastal power plants is a known source of atmospheric bromoform. A large source of anthropogenic bromoform is the industrial regions in East Asia. In current bottom-up flux estimates, these anthropogenic emissions are missing, underestimating the global air–sea flux of bromoform. With transport simulations, we show that by including anthropogenic bromoform from cooling-water treatment, the bottom-up flux estimates significantly improve in East and Southeast Asia.
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