Articles | Volume 21, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16609–16630, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16609-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16609–16630, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16609-2021

Research article 12 Nov 2021

Research article | 12 Nov 2021

A climatology of trade-wind cumulus cold pools and their link to mesoscale cloud organization

Raphaela Vogel et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-420', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Jun 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC1', Raphaela Vogel, 15 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-420', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 Jul 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Raphaela Vogel, 15 Sep 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-420', Anonymous Referee #3, 20 Jul 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-420', Raphaela Vogel, 15 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Sarah Buchmann on behalf of the Authors (16 Sep 2021)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (16 Sep 2021) by Farahnaz Khosrawi
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (03 Oct 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Oct 2021) by Farahnaz Khosrawi
AR by Raphaela Vogel on behalf of the Authors (12 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The shallow cumulus clouds that populate the trade-wind regions can produce substantial amounts of rain. Before reaching the surface, part of the rain can evaporate and form pools of cold air that spread at the surface as density currents. We use 10 years of data from Barbados to show that such cold pools occur on 3 out of 4 d, that cold-pool periods are 90 % cloudier relative to the average winter conditions, and that they are connected to specific patterns of mesoscale cloud organization.
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