Articles | Volume 21, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 1649–1681, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1649-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 1649–1681, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1649-2021

Research article 09 Feb 2021

Research article | 09 Feb 2021

Impacts of multi-layer overlap on contrail radiative forcing

Inés Sanz-Morère et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Sebastian Eastham on behalf of the Authors (31 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Aug 2020) by Michael Pitts
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (08 Sep 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (05 Oct 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (20 Oct 2020) by Michael Pitts
AR by Sebastian Eastham on behalf of the Authors (20 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Nov 2020) by Michael Pitts
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 Nov 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Dec 2020)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (23 Dec 2020) by Michael Pitts
AR by Sebastian Eastham on behalf of the Authors (28 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Contrails cause ~50 % of aviation climate impacts, but this is highly uncertain. This is partly due to the effect of overlap between contrails and other cloud layers. We developed a model to quantify this effect, finding that overlap with natural clouds increased contrails' radiative forcing in 2015. This suggests that cloud avoidance may help in reducing aviation's climate impacts. We also find that contrail–contrail overlap reduces impacts by ~3 %, increasing non-linearly with optical depth.
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