Articles | Volume 21, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15771–15781, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15771-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15771–15781, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15771-2021

Research article 22 Oct 2021

Research article | 22 Oct 2021

An Arctic ozone hole in 2020 if not for the Montreal Protocol

Catherine Wilka et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2020-1297', Anonymous Referee #1, 08 Feb 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2020-1297', Anonymous Referee #2, 12 Mar 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2020-1297', Catherine Wilka, 23 Apr 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Catherine Wilka on behalf of the Authors (23 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Apr 2021) by Yafang Cheng
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 May 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 May 2021) by Yafang Cheng
AR by Catherine Wilka on behalf of the Authors (26 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Jun 2021) by Yafang Cheng
Download
Short summary
We use satellite and balloon measurements to evaluate modeled ozone loss seen in the unusually cold Arctic of 2020 in the real world and compare it to simulations of a world avoided. We show that extensive denitrification in 2020 provides an important test case for stratospheric model process representations. If the Montreal Protocol had not banned ozone-depleting substances, an Arctic ozone hole would have emerged for the first time in spring 2020 that is comparable to those in the Antarctic.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint