Articles | Volume 21, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14371–14384, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14371-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14371–14384, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14371-2021

Research article 28 Sep 2021

Research article | 28 Sep 2021

The outflow of Asian biomass burning carbonaceous aerosol into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in spring: radiative effects seen in a global model

Prashant Chavan et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-494', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', S. Fadnavis, 27 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-494', Anonymous Referee #2, 28 Jul 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', S. Fadnavis, 27 Aug 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by S. Fadnavis on behalf of the Authors (27 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (31 Aug 2021) by Farahnaz Khosrawi
AR by S. Fadnavis on behalf of the Authors (01 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Biomass burning (BB) over Asia is a strong source of carbonaceous aerosols during spring. Here, we show an outflow of Asian BB carbonaceous aerosols into the UTLS. These aerosols enhance atmospheric heating and produce circulation changes that lead to the enhancement of water vapor in the UTLS over the tropics. In the stratosphere, water vapor is further transported to the South Pole by the Brewer–Dobson circulation. Enhancement of water vapor in the UTLS has implications for climate change.
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