Articles | Volume 21, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14371–14384, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14371-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14371–14384, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14371-2021

Research article 28 Sep 2021

Research article | 28 Sep 2021

The outflow of Asian biomass burning carbonaceous aerosol into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in spring: radiative effects seen in a global model

Prashant Chavan et al.

Data sets

Resolution Imaging Spectrodiometer (MODIS) NASA https://firms.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/download

MODATML2 NASA https://ladsweb.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/archive/allData/61/MODATML2/

Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) NASA https://misr.jpl.nasa.gov/getData/accessData/

Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) NASA https://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/

NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2: Pressure Level NOAA/OAR/ESRL PSL https://psl.noaa.gov/data/gridded/data.ncep.reanalysis2.pressure.html

OSIRIS on Odin University of Saskatchewan https://psl.noaa.gov/data/gridded/data.ncep.reanalysis2.pressure.html

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Short summary
Biomass burning (BB) over Asia is a strong source of carbonaceous aerosols during spring. Here, we show an outflow of Asian BB carbonaceous aerosols into the UTLS. These aerosols enhance atmospheric heating and produce circulation changes that lead to the enhancement of water vapor in the UTLS over the tropics. In the stratosphere, water vapor is further transported to the South Pole by the Brewer–Dobson circulation. Enhancement of water vapor in the UTLS has implications for climate change.
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