Articles | Volume 21, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14235–14250, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14235-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14235–14250, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14235-2021

Research article 24 Sep 2021

Research article | 24 Sep 2021

Mass and density of individual frozen hydrometeors

Karlie N. Rees et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-179', Anonymous Referee #1, 23 Apr 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-179', David Mitchell, 07 May 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-179', Timothy Garrett, 09 Aug 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Timothy Garrett on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (15 Aug 2021) by Barbara Ervens
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Short summary
Accurate predictions of weather and climate require descriptions of the mass and density of snowflakes as a function of their size. Few measurements have been obtained to date because snowflakes are so small and fragile. This article describes results from a new instrument that automatically measures individual snowflake size, mass, and density. Key findings are that small snowflakes have much lower densities than is often assumed and that snowflake density increases with temperature.
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