Articles | Volume 21, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 12359–12383, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-12359-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 12359–12383, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-12359-2021

Research article 18 Aug 2021

Research article | 18 Aug 2021

Observation and modeling of the historic “Godzilla” African dust intrusion into the Caribbean Basin and the southern US in June 2020

Hongbin Yu et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-73', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 May 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Hongbin YU, 19 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-73', Anonymous Referee #2, 05 Jul 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Hongbin YU, 19 Jul 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Hongbin YU, 19 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Hongbin YU on behalf of the Authors (20 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (20 Jul 2021) by Joshua Fu
AR by Hongbin YU on behalf of the Authors (22 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (22 Jul 2021) by Joshua Fu
AR by Hongbin YU on behalf of the Authors (22 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
This study characterizes a historic African dust intrusion into the Caribbean Basin in June 2020 using satellites and NASA GEOS. Dust emissions in West Africa were large albeit not extreme. However, a unique synoptic system accumulated the dust near the coast for about 4 d before it was ventilated. Although GEOS reproduced satellite-observed plume tracks well, it substantially underestimated dust emissions and did not lift up dust high enough for ensuing long-range transport.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint