Articles | Volume 21, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 11161–11177, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-11161-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 11161–11177, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-11161-2021

Research article 23 Jul 2021

Research article | 23 Jul 2021

Lightning occurrences and intensity over the Indian region: long-term trends and future projections

Rohit Chakraborty et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2020-1280', Anonymous Referee #3, 16 Feb 2021
    • RC2: 'RC2', Anonymous Referee #1, 14 Apr 2021
      • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Rohit Chakraborty, 20 May 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Rohit Chakraborty, 20 May 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Rohit Chakraborty on behalf of the Authors (20 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Jun 2021) by Zhanqing Li
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (08 Jun 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish as is (21 Jun 2021) by Zhanqing Li
Download
Short summary
In this study, urbanization-induced surface warming has been found to trigger prominent changes in upper-troposphere–lower-stratosphere regions leading to stronger and more frequent lightning extremes over India. Consequently, the implementation of this hypothesis in global climate models reveals that lightning frequency and intensity values across India will rise by ~10–25 % and 15–50 %, respectively, by 2100 at the current urbanization rate, which should be alarming for present policymakers.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint