Articles | Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4439–4457, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4439-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4439–4457, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4439-2019

Research article 05 Apr 2019

Research article | 05 Apr 2019

Effects of urbanization on regional meteorology and air quality in Southern California

Yun Li et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by George Ban-Weiss on behalf of the Authors (13 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 Feb 2019) by Robert Harley
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (22 Feb 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (05 Mar 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (06 Mar 2019) by Robert Harley
AR by George Ban-Weiss on behalf of the Authors (10 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (11 Mar 2019) by Robert Harley
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Short summary
In this study, we find that land surface changes via urbanization have caused reductions (increases) in air temperature and ventilation during the day (night) in Southern California. Changes in meteorology have consequently caused (a) increases in PM2.5 during the day, vice versa at night, and (b) increases in O3 for most times of day. These results suggest that all environmental systems should be taken into account when studying the influence of policies that impact the land surface in cities.
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