Articles | Volume 19, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 15431–15446, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-15431-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 15431–15446, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-15431-2019

Research article 17 Dec 2019

Research article | 17 Dec 2019

Long-lived high-frequency gravity waves in the atmospheric boundary layer: observations and simulations

Mingjiao Jia et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Haiyun Xia on behalf of the Authors (30 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Oct 2019) by Geraint Vaughan
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (10 Oct 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Oct 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Oct 2019) by Geraint Vaughan
AR by Haiyun Xia on behalf of the Authors (31 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (08 Nov 2019) by Geraint Vaughan
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Short summary
Gravitational waves (GWs) with periods ranging from 10 to 30 min over 10 h and 20 wave cycles are detected within a 2 km height in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by a coherent Doppler wind lidar. Observations and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations lead to a conclusion that the GWs are excited by the wind shear of a low-level jet under the condition of light horizontal wind. The GWs are trapped in the ABL due to a combination of thermal and Doppler ducts.
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