Articles | Volume 18, issue 6
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 4329–4348, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-4329-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 4329–4348, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-4329-2018
Research article
28 Mar 2018
Research article | 28 Mar 2018

A revised global ozone dry deposition estimate based on a new two-layer parameterisation for air–sea exchange and the multi-year MACC composition reanalysis

Ashok K. Luhar et al.

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Cited articles

Bariteau, L., Helmig, D., Fairall, C. W., Hare, J. E., Hueber, J., and Lang, E. K.: Determination of oceanic ozone deposition by ship-borne eddy covariance flux measurements, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 3, 441–455, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-3-441-2010, 2010.
Carpenter, L. J. and Nightingale, P. D.: Chemistry and release of gases from the surface ocean, Chem. Rev., 115, 4015–4034, https://doi.org/10.1021/cr5007123, 2015.
Carpenter, L. J., MacDonald, S. M., Shaw, M. D., Kumar, R., Saunders, R. W., Parthipan, R., Wilson, J., and Plane, J. M. C.: Atmospheric iodine levels influenced by sea surface emissions of inorganic iodine, Nat. Geosci., 6, 108–111, https://doi.org/10.1038/NGEO1687, 2013.
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Short summary
Dry deposition at the Earth’s surface is an important sink of atmospheric ozone. A new parameterisation for ozone dry deposition to the ocean that accounts for relevant chemical and physical processes is developed and tested. It results in an ocean deposition loss that is only about a third of the current model estimates and corresponds to an increase of 5 % in the tropospheric ozone burden. This is important for tropospheric ozone budget, associated radiative forcing, and ozone mixing ratios.
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