Articles | Volume 18, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 16689–16711, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-16689-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 16689–16711, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-16689-2018
Research article
26 Nov 2018
Research article | 26 Nov 2018

The importance of blowing snow to halogen-containing aerosol in coastal Antarctica: influence of source region versus wind speed

Michael R. Giordano et al.

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Cited articles

Allan, J. D., Bower, K. N., Coe, H., Boudries, H., Jayne, J. T., Canagaratna, M. R., Millet, D. B., Goldstein, A. H., Quinn, P. K., Weber, R. J., and Worsnop, D. R.: Submicron aerosol composition at Trinidad Head, California, during ITCT 2K2: Its relationship with gas phase volatile organic carbon and assessment of instrument performance, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 109, D23S24, https://doi.org/10.1029/2003JD004208, 2004. 
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Beresheim, H. and Eisele, F. L.: Sulfur chemistry in the Antarctic troposphere experiment: an overview of project SCATE, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 1619–1627, 1998. 
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The 2ODIAC field campaign was the first deployment of a high-resolution, real-time mass spectrometer to continental Antarctica. Using the real-time aerosol measurements, we investigate how the composition of Antarctic submicron aerosol changes as a function of meteorological parameters such as wind speed. We observe blowing snow and increasing aerosol concentration and changing composition, in particular halogens, as the wind increases beyond 8 m s−1.
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