Articles | Volume 17, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11707–11726, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11707-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11707–11726, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11707-2017

Research article 05 Oct 2017

Research article | 05 Oct 2017

Biomass burning at Cape Grim: exploring photochemistry using multi-scale modelling

Sarah J. Lawson et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Sarah Lawson on behalf of the Authors (06 Jul 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Jul 2017) by Alex B. Guenther
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (03 Aug 2017)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (08 Aug 2017) by Alex B. Guenther
AR by Sarah Lawson on behalf of the Authors (04 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Short summary
A high-resolution chemical transport model was used to reproduce observed smoke plumes. The model output was highly sensitive to fire emission factors and meteorology, particularly for secondary pollutant ozone. Aged urban air (age = 2 days) was the major source of ozone observed, with minor contributions from the fire. This work highlights the importance of assessing model sensitivity and the use of modelling to determine the contribution from different sources to atmospheric composition.
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