Articles | Volume 17, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11707–11726, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11707-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11707–11726, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11707-2017

Research article 05 Oct 2017

Research article | 05 Oct 2017

Biomass burning at Cape Grim: exploring photochemistry using multi-scale modelling

Sarah J. Lawson et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 1,481 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
931 486 64 1,481 132 39 60
  • HTML: 931
  • PDF: 486
  • XML: 64
  • Total: 1,481
  • Supplement: 132
  • BibTeX: 39
  • EndNote: 60
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Dec 2016)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Dec 2016)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,465 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,455 with geography defined and 10 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 04 Dec 2021
Short summary
A high-resolution chemical transport model was used to reproduce observed smoke plumes. The model output was highly sensitive to fire emission factors and meteorology, particularly for secondary pollutant ozone. Aged urban air (age = 2 days) was the major source of ozone observed, with minor contributions from the fire. This work highlights the importance of assessing model sensitivity and the use of modelling to determine the contribution from different sources to atmospheric composition.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint