Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10195–10221, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10195-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10195–10221, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10195-2017

Research article 31 Aug 2017

Research article | 31 Aug 2017

The microphysics of clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula – Part 2: modelling aspects within Polar WRF

Constantino Listowski and Tom Lachlan-Cope

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Modelling Antarctic tropospheric clouds remains challenging because of the lack of observations in this remote place. We use aircraft in situ observations to assess the performances of simulations over the Antarctic Peninsula within the Polar Weather Research and Forecasting model. The cloud scheme used by the operational forecast model AMPS performs the least well. Ice microphysics is key for correctly modelling the supercooled liquid phase and hence for lowering the surface radiative biases.
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