Articles | Volume 22, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6309–6325, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6309-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6309–6325, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6309-2022
Research article
 | Highlight paper
17 May 2022
Research article  | Highlight paper | 17 May 2022

Oceanic emissions of dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol and their contribution to sulfur dioxide production in the marine atmosphere

Gordon A. Novak et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-891', Anonymous Referee #1, 25 Nov 2021
    • RC2: 'Correction for Referee comment 1', Anonymous Referee #1, 25 Nov 2021
      • AC1: 'Response to Reviewer 1', Gordon A. Novak, 05 Apr 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-891', Anonymous Referee #2, 11 Mar 2022
    • AC2: 'Response to Reviewer 2', Gordon A. Novak, 05 Apr 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Gordon A. Novak on behalf of the Authors (05 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (13 Apr 2022) by Eliza Harris

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Gordon A. Novak on behalf of the Authors (12 May 2022)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (12 May 2022) by Eliza Harris
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Short summary
We describe field measurements of the mixing ratio and oceanic emission flux of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and methanethiol (MeSH) from a coastal ocean site. DMS is known to impact aerosol formation and growth in the marine atmosphere, influencing cloud formation and climate. Measurements of MeSH, which is produced by the same oceanic source as DMS, are rare. We show that MeSH emissions are large and must be measured alongside DMS to understand marine sulfur chemistry and aerosol formation.
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