Articles | Volume 22, issue 6
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4075–4099, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4075-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4075–4099, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4075-2022
Research article
29 Mar 2022
Research article | 29 Mar 2022

Impact of biomass burning and stratospheric intrusions in the remote South Pacific Ocean troposphere

Nikos Daskalakis et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-640', Anonymous Referee #1, 05 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-640', Anonymous Referee #2, 14 Nov 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-640', Nikos Daskalakis, 26 Jan 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Nikos Daskalakis on behalf of the Authors (26 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (07 Feb 2022) by Christopher Cantrell
AR by Nikos Daskalakis on behalf of the Authors (15 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Forest fires emit carbon monoxide (CO) that can be transported into the atmosphere far from the sources and reacts to produce ozone (O3) that affects climate, ecosystems and health. O3 is also produced in the stratosphere and can be transported downwards. Using a global numerical model, we found that forest fires can affect CO and O3 even in the South Pacific, the most pristine region of the global ocean, but transport from the stratosphere is a more important O3 source than fires in the region.
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