Articles | Volume 22, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-3391-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-3391-2022
Research article
 | 
14 Mar 2022
Research article |  | 14 Mar 2022

A strong statistical link between aerosol indirect effects and the self-similarity of rainfall distributions

Kalli Furtado and Paul Field

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Latest update: 18 May 2024
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Short summary
The complex processes involved mean that no simple answer to this question has so far been discovered: do aerosols increase or decrease precipitation? Using high-resolution weather simulations, we find a self-similar property of rainfall that is not affected by aerosols. Using this invariant, we can collapse all our simulations to a single curve. So, although aerosol effects on rain are many, there may be a universal constraint on the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent them.
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