Articles | Volume 22, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 3391–3407, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-3391-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 3391–3407, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-3391-2022

Research article 14 Mar 2022

Research article | 14 Mar 2022

A strong statistical link between aerosol indirect effects and the self-similarity of rainfall distributions

Kalli Furtado and Paul Field

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-443', Anonymous Referee #1, 22 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Kalli Furtado, 06 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-443', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 Jul 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Kalli Furtado, 06 Oct 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kalli Furtado on behalf of the Authors (06 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Nov 2021) by Franziska Glassmeier
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (09 Nov 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (30 Nov 2021) by Franziska Glassmeier
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Short summary
The complex processes involved mean that no simple answer to this question has so far been discovered: do aerosols increase or decrease precipitation? Using high-resolution weather simulations, we find a self-similar property of rainfall that is not affected by aerosols. Using this invariant, we can collapse all our simulations to a single curve. So, although aerosol effects on rain are many, there may be a universal constraint on the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent them.
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