Articles | Volume 22, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 1549–1573, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1549-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 1549–1573, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1549-2022

Research article 01 Feb 2022

Research article | 01 Feb 2022

Exploring dimethyl sulfide (DMS) oxidation and implications for global aerosol radiative forcing

Ka Ming Fung et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-782', Anonymous Referee #1, 08 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-782', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 Nov 2021
  • AC1: 'Reply to the Comments on acp-2021-782', Ka Ming Fung, 01 Dec 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Ka Ming Fung on behalf of the Authors (01 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (09 Dec 2021) by Anja Schmidt
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (09 Dec 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (16 Dec 2021)
ED: Publish as is (17 Dec 2021) by Anja Schmidt
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Short summary
Understanding the natural aerosol burden in the preindustrial era is crucial for us to assess how atmospheric aerosols affect the Earth's radiative budgets. Our study explores how a detailed description of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) oxidation (implemented in the Community Atmospheric Model version 6 with chemistry, CAM6-chem) could help us better estimate the present-day and preindustrial concentrations of sulfate and other relevant chemicals, as well as the resulting aerosol radiative impacts.
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