Articles | Volume 22, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15263–15285, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15263-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15263–15285, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15263-2022
Research article
01 Dec 2022
Research article | 01 Dec 2022

Atmospheric particle abundance and sea salt aerosol observations in the springtime Arctic: a focus on blowing snow and leads

Qianjie Chen et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-442', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Jul 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2022-442', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 Jul 2022
  • AC1: 'Response to reviewers', Kerri Pratt, 07 Oct 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kerri Pratt on behalf of the Authors (07 Oct 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Oct 2022) by Roya Bahreini
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Oct 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Oct 2022) by Roya Bahreini
AR by Kerri Pratt on behalf of the Authors (01 Nov 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes
ED: Publish as is (06 Nov 2022) by Roya Bahreini
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Short summary
During a spring field campaign in the coastal Arctic, ultrafine particles were enhanced during high wind speeds, and coarse-mode particles were reduced during blowing snow. Calculated periods blowing snow were overpredicted compared to observations. Sea spray aerosols produced by sea ice leads affected the composition of aerosols and snowpack. An improved understanding of aerosol emissions from leads and blowing snow is critical for predicting the future climate of the rapidly warming Arctic.
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