Articles | Volume 21, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 9105–9124, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9105-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 9105–9124, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9105-2021

Research article 15 Jun 2021

Research article | 15 Jun 2021

Large-scale synoptic drivers of co-occurring summertime ozone and PM2.5 pollution in eastern China

Lian Zong et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Yuanjian Yang on behalf of the Authors (05 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Jan 2021) by Xiaohong Liu
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (14 Feb 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (20 Feb 2021)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (20 Feb 2021) by Xiaohong Liu
AR by Yuanjian Yang on behalf of the Authors (29 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Apr 2021) by Xiaohong Liu
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Apr 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Apr 2021) by Xiaohong Liu
AR by Yuanjian Yang on behalf of the Authors (20 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (05 May 2021) by Xiaohong Liu
AR by Yuanjian Yang on behalf of the Authors (13 May 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
In recent years, summer O3 pollution over eastern China has become more serious, and it is even the case that surface O3 and PM2.5 pollution can co-occur. However, the synoptic weather pattern (SWP) related to this compound pollution remains unclear. Regional PM2.5 and O3 compound pollution is characterized by various SWPs with different dominant factors. Our findings provide insights into the regional co-occurring high PM2.5 and O3 levels via the effects of certain meteorological factors.
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