Articles | Volume 21, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16645–16659, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16645-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16645–16659, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16645-2021

Research article 15 Nov 2021

Research article | 15 Nov 2021

Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations of biomass burning products in the stratosphere from Canadian forest fires in August 2017

Hugh C. Pumphrey et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Hugh C. Pumphrey on behalf of the Authors (02 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Jun 2021) by Farahnaz Khosrawi
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (22 Jun 2021)
RR by Pasquale Sellitto (09 Jul 2021)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (13 Jul 2021) by Farahnaz Khosrawi
AR by Hugh C. Pumphrey on behalf of the Authors (17 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (26 Aug 2021) by Farahnaz Khosrawi
AR by Hugh C. Pumphrey on behalf of the Authors (09 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Forest fires in British Columbia in August 2017 caused an unusual phenomonon: smoke and gases from the fires rose quickly to a height of 10 km. From there, the pollution continued to rise more slowly for many weeks, travelling around the world as it did so. In this paper, we describe how we used data from a satellite instrument to observe this polluted volume of air. The satellite has now been working for 16 years but has observed only three events of this type.
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