Articles | Volume 21, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16277–16291, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16277-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16277–16291, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16277-2021

Research article 16 Nov 2021

Research article | 16 Nov 2021

Changes in biomass burning, wetland extent, or agriculture drive atmospheric NH3 trends in select African regions

Jonathan E. Hickman et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jonathan Hickman on behalf of the Authors (03 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Jun 2021) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (16 Jul 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (22 Jul 2021) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
AR by Jonathan Hickman on behalf of the Authors (25 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (31 Aug 2021) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
AR by Jonathan Hickman on behalf of the Authors (03 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Jonathan Hickman on behalf of the Authors (05 Oct 2021)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (05 Oct 2021) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
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Short summary
Ammonia (NH3) gas emitted from soils and biomass burning contributes to particulate air pollution. We used satellite observations of the atmosphere over Africa to show that declines in NH3 concentrations over South Sudan's Sudd wetland in 2008–2017 are related to variation in wetland extent. We also find NH3 concentrations increased in West Africa as a result of biomass burning and increased in the Lake Victoria region, likely due to agricultural expansion and intensification.
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