Articles | Volume 21, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 13333–13351, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13333-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 13333–13351, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13333-2021

Research article 09 Sep 2021

Research article | 09 Sep 2021

Role of Criegee intermediates in the formation of sulfuric acid at a Mediterranean (Cape Corsica) site under influence of biogenic emissions

Alexandre Kukui et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review of acp-2021-199', Anonymous Referee #2, 02 May 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-199', Anonymous Referee #3, 25 Jun 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-199', Anonymous Referee #4, 30 Jun 2021
  • AC1: 'Response to referees', Alexandre Kukui, 02 Aug 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Alexandre Kukui on behalf of the Authors (03 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (06 Aug 2021) by Ivan Kourtchev
AR by Alexandre Kukui on behalf of the Authors (14 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 Aug 2021) by Ivan Kourtchev
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Short summary
Sulfuric acid, H2SO4, plays a key role in formation of secondary atmospheric aerosol particles. It is generally accepted that the major atmospheric source of H2SO4 is the reaction of OH radicals with SO2. In this study, importance of an additional H2SO4 source via oxidation of SO2 by stabilized Criegee intermediates was estimated based on measurements at a remote site on Cape Corsica. It was found that the oxidation of SO2 by SCI may be an important source of H2SO4, especially during nighttime.
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