Articles | Volume 20, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 7243–7258, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7243-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 7243–7258, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7243-2020

Research article 23 Jun 2020

Research article | 23 Jun 2020

Consumption of CH3Cl, CH3Br, and CH3I and emission of CHCl3, CHBr3, and CH2Br2 from the forefield of a retreating Arctic glacier

Moya L. Macdonald et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Moya Macdonald on behalf of the Authors (17 Apr 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (12 May 2020) by Andreas Engel
AR by Moya Macdonald on behalf of the Authors (14 May 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Climate change has caused glaciers in the Arctic to shrink, uncovering new soils. We used field measurements to study the exchange of a group of gases involved in ozone destruction, called halocarbons, between these new soils and the atmosphere. We found that mats of cyanobacteria, early colonisers of soils, are linked to a larger-than-expected exchange of halocarbons with the atmosphere. We also found that gases which are commonly thought to be marine in origin were released from these soils.
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