Articles | Volume 20, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 7243–7258, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7243-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 7243–7258, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7243-2020

Research article 23 Jun 2020

Research article | 23 Jun 2020

Consumption of CH3Cl, CH3Br, and CH3I and emission of CHCl3, CHBr3, and CH2Br2 from the forefield of a retreating Arctic glacier

Moya L. Macdonald et al.

Data sets

Gas fluxes and biological and physiochemical measurements made across an Arctic forefield. M. L. Macdonald, J. L. Wadham, D. Young, C. Lunder, O. Hermansen, G. Lamarche-Gagnon, and S. O'Dohery https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.8081129

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Short summary
Climate change has caused glaciers in the Arctic to shrink, uncovering new soils. We used field measurements to study the exchange of a group of gases involved in ozone destruction, called halocarbons, between these new soils and the atmosphere. We found that mats of cyanobacteria, early colonisers of soils, are linked to a larger-than-expected exchange of halocarbons with the atmosphere. We also found that gases which are commonly thought to be marine in origin were released from these soils.
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