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ACP | Articles | Volume 20, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 10707–10731, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10707-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 10707–10731, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10707-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 11 Sep 2020

Research article | 11 Sep 2020

Attribution of ground-level ozone to anthropogenic and natural sources of nitrogen oxides and reactive carbon in a global chemical transport model

Tim Butler et al.

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TOAST 1.0: Tropospheric Ozone Attribution of Sources with Tagging for CESM 1.2.2 T. Butler, A. Lupascu, J. Coates, and S. Zhu https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-2825-2018

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Ground-level ozone (O3) is not directly emitted; it is formed chemically in the atmosphere. Some ground-level O3 is transported from the stratosphere, but most O3 is produced from reactive precursors that are emitted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. We present the results of a novel source apportionment method for ground-level O3. Our results are consistent with previous work and also provide new insights. In particular, we highlight the roles of methane and international shipping.
Ground-level ozone (O3) is not directly emitted; it is formed chemically in the atmosphere. Some...
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